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Fleay's Barred Frog
Similar Animals:
 Northern Barred Frog
 Great Barred Frog
 Giant Barred Frog
 Stuttering Frog
 


Fleay's Barred Frog


Fleay's Barred Frog Range Map (Eastern Australia)
Fleay's Barred Frog Range Map
(Eastern Australia)

Latin Name Mixophyes fleayi
Conservation Status Endangered
Location Eastern Australia
Colour Brown
Length Up to 9 cms (3.5 inches)
Habit

Mostly Terrestrial

Breeding Season

Spring & Summer

Main Characteristics

Fleay's Barred Frogs are a fairly large species of frog and they grown up to 9 cms (3.5 inches) in length. They are pale brown in colour with dark markings which consist of narrow bars on their legs, spots on their flanks, a dark stripe on their head which starts at the nostril and continues through each eye, and a dark irregular band that starts behind their eyes and continues down their back.

Their dorsal surface is finely granular in texture while their underside is smooth and pale yellow or white in colour. Their toes are three quarters webbed and the top third of their iris is silver/pale blue while the remaining two thirds is brown.


Habitat

Fleay's Barred Frogs are found in small pockets of rainforest in eastern Australia. They often hide among leaf litter and vegetation and prefer to live near fast flowing streams.

Diet

Fleay's Barred Frogs mainly feed on insects.

Breeding

Breeding occurs during spring and summer and males call out to attract females from leaf litter beside streams. Females dig out a small hollow nest, in gravel or leaf litter, in shallow water and they lay a clump of large eggs.

The tadpoles are large growing to 65 mm (2.6 inches) in length and they are dark brown in colour with fine gold flecks across their back.

They take approximately 200 days to metamorphose and the small froglets measure approximately 20 mm (0.79 inches) in length. They resemble the adult except their eye colour is copper/red.

Interesting Facts

Fleay's Barred Frogs are also known as:
Barred Frog

Fleay's Barred Frogs take their name from the Australian naturalist David Howells Fleay.

 


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